Posted in Being human, death, family, joy

My cat has scattered my dad’s memorial shrine again.

There’s very little he’ll leave alone, if given the chance.

My father's memorial shrine, with the picture knocked off-kilter, only one rock out of dozens, and a few of his childhood belongings including a small denim treasure bag and a couple wooden toy swords. The slide rule is not visible, and the other slide rule is missing. Lots of things are missing or moved from where they should be.
My father’s memorial shrine, with the picture knocked off-kilter, only one rock out of dozens, and a few of his childhood belongings including a small denim treasure bag and a couple wooden toy swords. The slide rule is not visible, and the other slide rule is missing. Lots of things are missing or moved from where they should be.

But the more I think about it… I like having a memorial shrine, I will put it back together again, but the cat will knock it over again unless I buy some museum putty or something, which I’m not sure I’m willing to do.

And the more I think about it, the more fitting it is that my dad’s things are sometimes all over the house, reminding me of him in everyday life.

I sleep with his rocks in my bed.

I wear his clothing.

I find things he owned everywhere.

I use his tools.

I’ve said before that objects are my best form of communication.  With my father, this is true.  All of his things don’t just each remind me of him. Each one had a specific relation to him.

Taken together, they point back to who he was with the precision of a laser beam.

And they will do that whether they are properly arranged on the shrine or scattered everywhere by the cat.

And I love remembering my father.  I love finding him in my current life, in who I have become.  I love relating to him in an ongoing way even though he is dead.  Because who he was can’t be erased and his influence on the world still exists and will always exist.

I don’t idealize him the way some people do when someone dies, though.  I remember the worst parts about him.  But I don’t feel like I’d be remembering him if I did otherwise.  It would feel like an insult to his memory to turn him into an image of something he never was.

But I also don’t feel the horrible feelings most people expect with grief, for the most part.  I feel like he is still in my life, just not present.  His things remind me of who he was, and his influences and actions ensure he’s still around in everything I do.  I still have an ongoing relationship with him.  Most of the time I remember him with joy.

Bottom line is, I love my father.  And maybe sometimes overzealous kittens make you put things in perspective.  Remembering my father is not confined to one part of the house, it is integrated into my life.  Memorial shrines are a good thing, don’t get me wrong, but having them disrupted can make you think.

 

Author:

Hufflepuff. Came from the redwoods, which tell me who I am and where I belong in the world. I relate to objects as if they are alive, but as things with identities and properties all of their own, not as something human-like. Culturally I'm from a California Okie background. Crochet or otherwise create constantly, write poetry and paint when I can. Proud member of the developmental disability self-advocacy movement. I care a lot more about being a human being than I care about what categories I fit into.

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