Posted in Being human, death, Death & Mortality Series, family

Saying goodbye to my dad.

Towards the end of 2014 was also the end of my dad’s life. He died at home. In his last few weeks, he couldn’t speak anymore. I was too sick to travel all the way across the country and into my parents’ house in the middle of the mountains. So I was the only member of our immediate family who couldn’t come to see him in person. And I couldn’t speak either.

We’d been doing video chats on Skype a lot. He’d talk, and I’d type, but mostly we just hung out and loved each other. But now neither of us could talk and he couldn’t type either.

When he became unable to talk anymore, my mom set up their laptop on my dad’s hospital bed, and started Skype video chats for us. Instead of talking or typing, we just stared at each other, and loved each other. And that’s how we said goodbye.

I never knew there were any photos taken at the time, but during the hospital stay after I broke my back a second time, my mom sent me this photo of me and my dad Skyping. I’m really glad to have these memories. I’m really glad we had the chance to say goodbye. I feel amazingly lucky for that.

My dad lying in a hospital bed doing a Skype video chat with me on a small laptop.

When he died, he sent me a chunk of his beard hairs. (When I was little, he always let me play with his beard and his loose skin.)

I have been wearing those in floating lockets ever since, and they’re really beautiful. Photos don’t do them justice. But I’m able to walk around with a piece of his beard worn as jewelry every day. My mom sent some more beard when I was in the hospital, because somehow in the lead-up to the hospital stay I lost my other locket, and my spare beard hairs are in a drawer somewhere inaccessible to me right now. So when she sent the other beard hairs, I was able to put them in a new locket. I’m equally grateful to have something physical and tangible to remember him by any time I want to. Beard hair is more durable than memory sometimes.

My father’s grey beard hairs in a circular metal floating locket.

And I’m really glad to have a father who understood how much can be said without saying it, who knew how to communicate using objects, and who spent his last days doing his best to love as much as he possibly could.

Posted in Being human, death, family, joy

My cat has scattered my dad’s memorial shrine again.

There’s very little he’ll leave alone, if given the chance.

My father's memorial shrine, with the picture knocked off-kilter, only one rock out of dozens, and a few of his childhood belongings including a small denim treasure bag and a couple wooden toy swords. The slide rule is not visible, and the other slide rule is missing. Lots of things are missing or moved from where they should be.
My father’s memorial shrine, with the picture knocked off-kilter, only one rock out of dozens, and a few of his childhood belongings including a small denim treasure bag and a couple wooden toy swords. The slide rule is not visible, and the other slide rule is missing. Lots of things are missing or moved from where they should be.

But the more I think about it… I like having a memorial shrine, I will put it back together again, but the cat will knock it over again unless I buy some museum putty or something, which I’m not sure I’m willing to do.

And the more I think about it, the more fitting it is that my dad’s things are sometimes all over the house, reminding me of him in everyday life.

I sleep with his rocks in my bed.

I wear his clothing.

I find things he owned everywhere.

I use his tools.

I’ve said before that objects are my best form of communication.  With my father, this is true.  All of his things don’t just each remind me of him. Each one had a specific relation to him.

Taken together, they point back to who he was with the precision of a laser beam.

And they will do that whether they are properly arranged on the shrine or scattered everywhere by the cat.

And I love remembering my father.  I love finding him in my current life, in who I have become.  I love relating to him in an ongoing way even though he is dead.  Because who he was can’t be erased and his influence on the world still exists and will always exist.

I don’t idealize him the way some people do when someone dies, though.  I remember the worst parts about him.  But I don’t feel like I’d be remembering him if I did otherwise.  It would feel like an insult to his memory to turn him into an image of something he never was.

But I also don’t feel the horrible feelings most people expect with grief, for the most part.  I feel like he is still in my life, just not present.  His things remind me of who he was, and his influences and actions ensure he’s still around in everything I do.  I still have an ongoing relationship with him.  Most of the time I remember him with joy.

Bottom line is, I love my father.  And maybe sometimes overzealous kittens make you put things in perspective.  Remembering my father is not confined to one part of the house, it is integrated into my life.  Memorial shrines are a good thing, don’t get me wrong, but having them disrupted can make you think.